DevOps in Business – Cloud or Not

“While functional responsibilities will remain specialized, innovation, implementation, and value realization must be shared between the business and IT.” And IT will need to continuously reduce its spending on “keeping the lights on” to free up resources and mindshare for innovation and problem solving.

Good article over at HBR – Yes, Managing IT is your Job

Makes a good case for tooling and automation in IT so that IT can closely align with business now and in perpetuity.  The article does not clearly call out that this model is, essentially, DevOps, nor does it delineate between traditional IT, including virtualization technologies, or Cloud.  However, it’s still a good read.

Passion trumps Experience

CVs are important.  Street cred and what you’ve done is valuable.  Wait no, they define you.

But if you don’t care about what you do, you won’t be successful at it.  You can manage the hell out of something and work tirelessly.  But if you aren’t passionate about what it is you do, your results will show it…for they will be but mediocrity.

For a good read on the value of Founders in a Startup even after the big boys come in to run things, check out – http://bsr.london.edu/lbs-article/767/index.html

Amazing story by an angelic journalist about 2 amazing boys

http://m.espn.go.com/general/story?storyId=9454322&src=desktop

Read it. You won’t be sorry.

One day I hope I can give to someone as selflessly as Lisa Fenn did.

En Garde!

Good luck Mr. Balmer, good luck sir.

http://gigaom.com/2013/07/11/one-microsoft-reorg-aims-to-break-down-silos-good-luck-with-that/?utm_source=General+Users&utm_campaign=589fda3514-c%3Acln%2Cmob%2Ctec%2Cvid%2Ccld%2Capl%2Ceur%2Cdta+d%3A07-11&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_1dd83065c6-589fda3514-99406685

Interview questions

I’ve been in so many interviews and conducted so many where I’ve walked away shaking my head that I wanted to share an important point – ASK QUESTIONS!  If you are an interviewer – be able to ask good questions and leave plenty of time to let the interviewee ask questions.  And then ANSWER them!  If you’re an interviewee – you have to ask good questions to help convey you want the job.

A few good questions to always keep in mind that I’ve particularly liked:

Questions to HR:

What benefits do you have?  Really the heart of this question is to understand what your compensation package is and how to value it.  Ask details here.

  • Do you have a 401k?
  • Do you get an employee match?
  • How much is it?
  • Who manages the 401k?
  • What benefits does a spouse or child get (medical / dental / vision)?
  • What about short-term and long-term disability?
  • Life insurance policy?
  • Relocation assistance (if applicable)?

Part of your compensation will likely be equity in the company.

  • How many stock options would I get?
  • How should I evaluate them?
  • What is the current strike price?
  • When was the last round of investment?
  • How much money is left in the bank?
  • How many outstanding shares are there?
  • Is there a profit sharing plan?
  • What does that look like?

Questions to your Manager:

What kind of manager are you?  When I’m either interviewing my to-be manager or looking for a new job, I want to know who I am working for.  No, I’m not trying to understand my employer.  This is about establishing rapport with my direct supervisor.

  • Is s/he a micro-manager?
  • Does s/he delegate all the work or do they partner with their team to enable them for success?
  • How will they facilitate your growth, professionally and personally, in the company?
  • How will they help you get visibility across the organization?

Watch A Teacher Make Her 3rd-Grade Kids Hate Each Other For The Best Reason Imaginable

OMG. I wish I had seen this in school. Amazing teacher. This type of education should be brought back into institutions.

Little River School Online

images“I saw this video in college, and I immediately changed my major. The payoff at the end is brilliant and a perfect metaphor for what we deal with and face every day in our society. Like “Catcher in the Rye” is to high school students, this is part of your Upworthy required reading.

1:30: This teacher begins a study that will be talked about for 40 years.
3:00: She re-creates segregation and racism in her classroom.
7:45: Mrs. Elliott flips the entire class on their heads.
10:00 Jane Elliot makes the most profound discovery about us all
11:43: The students learn something that the world is still struggling to.
There are too many great moments to point out. Just watch.” – Rafael Casal from

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